Michael W. Smith Christmas Light House

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COMMENTS(31)

  • 2012-12-07T00:50:43

I wish I could find a dvd with these videios. if anyone knows where to get them please let me know.

  • 2012-09-29T05:58:42

WRONG! http://www.teachpeace.com/peacesymbolhistory.htm You will be shocked how people think this is innocent like you! It is very appalling! I wish people knew the truth!

  • 2012-09-29T05:55:23

thanks also. God bless

  • 2012-09-29T05:54:09

You are absolutely correct! Scroll up to find my previous comments and link.

  • 2012-09-29T05:52:44

YOU ARE TOTALLY CORRECT! http://www.teachpeach.com/peacesymbolhistory.htm UNFORTUNATELY VERY FEW PEOPLE KNOW THE TRUTH! THANK YOU FOR SPEAKING UP TOO.

  • 2012-09-29T05:50:26

Terry Charles-Cross You are right that it is an ole timey peace sign. BUT very few people know the truth. Read the history of the Peace symbol. It is NOT what people think it is. Check out the link I gave above. http://www.teachpeace.com/peacesymbolhistory.htm

  • 2012-09-29T05:46:48

It is sad how so many people actually believe that it represents peace. I wish it did, but history states otherwise, and there aren't too many of us left that know the truth! Please educate yourself and others. The display is beautiful, but the Peace sign DID NOT belong with it. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but its about time the truth is told. Every time I see someone with it, I cringe, and think if only they knew the truth!! They would be shocked and appalled!

  • 2012-03-26T22:14:37

Terry A. Charles-Cross That set my age...lol yes it was a symbol used mainly in the 70's to mean peace. It has made a come back though.

  • 2012-03-16T00:12:21

Watching this now, months after Christmas reminds me that we seem to think of Christmas and Easter durring that specific month, but this stuff belongs in your head all 24-7.

  • 2011-12-30T05:21:45

All I can say is WOW...This was awesome..Praise the Lord..:)

  • 2011-12-25T09:39:46

the peace sign there on the roof is not Christian.. its a sign used by satans followers. the sign will give doubts to christian minds..pls. refined that work so that God be praised. God bless.

  • 2011-12-24T21:00:15

AWESOME display - I was so taken by the addition of the peace sign in the display and the fact it stayed lit constantly during the display. It really took me back and help signify the message of peace on earth for the world. Too beautiful to put into words - hat's off to you for design and construction - truly inspiring!

  • 2011-12-24T14:34:05

I also feel that the "peace" sign, which is really a broken cross upside down, does not belong in the light display that is supposed to honor Christ, because it is a tool of Satan, but I also think that the light show was done beautifully. Maybe next time the owners will consider either a cross or a hand in the victory position to signify the victory of Christ over death instead.

  • 2011-12-23T15:45:19

I have watched your light shows and they are beautiful. They hor the birth of Jesus in a very special way. Thank you and Merry Christmas.

  • 2011-12-23T08:05:18

The peace sign The first peace badge, 1958, made in ceramic for the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament by Eric Austen from Gerald Holtom's original design. "The Third of May 1808", Goya's painting of peasants before a firing squad referred to by Gerald Holtom, the designer of the peace sign. The internationally recognized symbol for peace was originally designed for the British nuclear disarmament movement by Gerald Holtom in 1958.[47] Holtom, an artist and designer, made it for a march from Trafalgar Square, London to the Atomic Weapons Research Establishment at Aldermaston in England, organised by the Direct Action Committee to take place in April and supported by the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND).[47][48][49][50] Eric Austen (1922–1999) adapted Holtom's designs to ceramic lapel badges.[51][52] The symbol is a combination of the semaphore signals for the letters "N" and "D," standing for "nuclear disarmament".[47] In semaphore the letter "N" is formed by a person holding two flags in an upside-down "V," and the letter "D" is formed by holding one flag pointed straight up and the other pointed straight down. Superimposing these two signs forms the shape of the centre of the peace symbol.[47][53][54] The original drawing by Gerald Holtom of the CND symbol is housed in the Peace Museum in Bradford, England. Holtom later wrote to Hugh Brock, editor of Peace News, explaining the genesis of his idea in greater depth: "I was in despair. Deep despair. I drew myself: the representative of an individual in despair, with hands palm outstretched outwards and downwards in the manner of Goya's peasant before the firing squad. I formalised the drawing into a line and put a circle round it."[54] Ken Kolsbum, a correspondent of Holtom's, says that the designer came to regret the symbolism of despair, as he felt that peace was something to be celebrated and wanted the symbol to be inverted.[55] Eric Austen is said to have "discovered that the 'gesture of despair' motif had long been associated with 'the death of man', and the circle with 'the unborn child',"[51] possibly referring to images in Rudolf Koch's The Book of Signs, (Das Zeichenbuch, 1923) an English edition of which had been published in 1955.[56] Semaphore for "N" Semaphore for "D" The symbol became the badge of CND and wearing it became a sign of support for the campaign for unilateral nuclear disarmament by Britain. An account of CND's early history described it as "a visual adhesive to bind the [Aldermaston] March and later the whole Campaign together ... probably the most powerful, memorable and adaptable image ever designed for a secular cause."[51] Not patented or restricted, the symbol spread beyond CND and was adopted by the wider anti-war movement. It became known in the United States in 1958 when Albert Bigelow, a pacifist protester, sailed a small boat fitted with the CND banner into the vicinity of a nuclear test.[57] Buttons with the symbol were imported into the United States in 1960 by Philip Altbach, a freshman at the University of Chicago. Altbach had traveled to England to meet with British peace groups as a delegate from the Student Peace Union (SPU) and on his return he persuaded the SPU to adopt the symbol. Between 1960 and 1964 they sold thousands of the buttons on college campuses. By end of the decade it had become a generic peace sign,[58] crossing national and cultural boundaries.[59] An article published in 1970 by the John Birch Society claimed that the peace symbol had Communist, anti-Christian, Satanist and Nazi associations,[54][60][61][62] a claim that has been repeated by Christian conservatives.[63] In Unicode, the peace symbol is U+262E: ☮, and can thus be generated in HTML by typing ☮ or ☮. However, internet browsers may not have a typeface that can display it.

  • 2011-12-23T07:57:46

Jesus can give u peace not a sign

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